I've been a full-time farrier for 15 years.  During that time I've struggled first hand
with the inaccessibility of real horse dentistry in my area.  In February of 2001 I
went out to Glens Ferry Idaho, after many months of study and preparation, and
took a very thorough and comprehensive two week course at the Academy of
Equine Dentistry, and began practicing equine dentistry.  The school is featured in
the sidebar at the upper right hand side of this page.  It's an internationally
esteemed equine dental school for both lay people and veterinary practitioners
from all over the world.  They give you, arguably, the best training, preparation,
and resources available with which to, given the effort and willingness, follow
through and attain to the highest level of proficiency in the field of horse dentistry.
                     
Because of the growing shortfall of people able and willing to practice equine
dentistry, including those from  within the veterinary community itself, I've had
the good fortune to be in a position to effect the availability and performance of
equine dentistry in my region.



Out of self-interest, the veterinarian community lobbied and succeeded in making
it illegal for anyone but themselves to independently practice horse dentistry. This
has had an adverse effect on the quality of equine dentistry available to the average
horse owner.  Below, are some of the efforts around the country to change those
laws.
Here's a little bit about me.
Gleason, WI                          Email: saunderstodd@yahoo.com         Phone: 715-367-6561
My Equine
Dentistry Forum

Click Here For:
Questions and
conversation with
me on equine
dentistry.

Click on
"comments" at the
end to leave a
comment or
question of your
own.
Some brief informal articles I've written concerning often asked questions.
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Est. 2001  -  Retired 2011
Various Efforts Around the Country to Legalize Horse Dentistry when done by
Certified Non-Veterinarians.
This is a good picture from underneathe the jaw showing how the
upper cheekteeth tables are much farther apart than the adjacent
lowers in the resting position.  As the horse chews, the lower cheek
teeth unavoidably sharpen the outer edges of the wider upper cheek
teeth causing sharpness that can then become a bitting problem.
*Note the very encouraging new law changes in Virginia below.  
- Registered non-veterinarian equine dental
technicians can now practice freely in Virginia.  
Slowly, these laws will spread from state to state.
or...
**note my new phone number and address as of 9-15-08
Here's
another
interesting
development
in Texas in
the ongoing
process of
reversing the
monopoly in
equine dentistry
away from the,
in this case,
self-interested
veterinary
industry.
Index
Discussion
***
Stevie Hartman NCLMT,
Cerified Equine Message/MFR
715-583-4583
cshartman@centurytel.net
Equine Dentistry Page
I am no longer practicing equine dentistry commercially.  
Only on an emergency basis.  Have since gone into nursing.